My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—Friday evening, in New York City, I went to a very charming dinner, given before the opening of Macy's Latin-American Fair. Even during the dinner, the stage was set, for we were delightfully entertained with music and dancing, performed by artists from our neighboring republics.

At the fair, I could not help but be impressed by the architecture of the buildings and the charming arrangement of flowers and merchandise. There will be music and dancing and food served during this exhibition. You can buy groceries, fruits, and handwork as they come from these neighbors of ours. Their designs and skills are also adapted to modern needs. Some of the leather work and rugs, and much of the glass and pottery, make you want to furnish a house at once.

After I left the fair, I stopped for a minute at a weekly dance given by Miss Anne Morgan's Committee at the Henry Hudson Hotel. Here, a crowd of boys in uniform, belonging to both services, were having a good time with some very charming girls.

On my arrival, they released some balloons from the balconies and I was told the boys and girls caught these. In two of them, lucky numbers were found, which entitled a boy and girl to a prize. I presented these prizes, but the boy who found the lucky number for the girl's prize, had lost his girl, so we had to send him scurrying, box in hand, to find her in the crowd.

I reached my office yesterday morning at 9:00 o'clock and was sorry to bid goodbye to Miss Eloise Davison, who has been Assistant Director of Civilian Defense, in charge of group activities, under Mayor La Guardia. The New York Herald-Tribune lent her for a part-time job, which took up all her time. She feels she must return to her job in New York City. Miss Davison hopes to be able to help civilian defense, however, by working in New York City on some special assignments for the Mayor.

Yesterday morning was spent largely with Dean James Landis at OCD, though I saw two or three members of the staff. The entire afternoon was taken up with appointments of various kinds. Mayor Cain of Tacoma, Wash., lunched with me and I was happy to see him again. I remembered how much impressed I was by the way in which he was taking hold of his job in the hectic week after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Last night I went to the Salvation Army Service Club, where I had promised to go last week and was not able to keep my appointment. They keep open house for the service men every Saturday night, and they wanted me to see their guests.

It is a relief to know that the Prime Minister of Great Britain is safely home. Whichever way he went, it seemed dangerous, but I confess that I felt that his going by air was less of a strain for me.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL