My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—We accomplished a great deal of work on our train trip yesterday, far more than I thought would be possible, so I am planning to take another one before long to finish various odd jobs.

On arrival here, I had to spend an hour and a half with the dentist, which is never a very pleasant occupation. Then I had a delightful tea party with my aunt, Mrs. Stanley Mortimer, and her son and daughter. The daughter is going to spend several months in Washington, which will be very pleasant.

In the evening, we went to see "Angel Street," which I recommend to anyone who wants to be absorbed and taken out of his daily round of interests. You sit on the edge of your chair most of the time, and it is really a grand mystery story. Every member of the cast is excellent.

The handsome villain is so well played that the audience hisses him, and the old detective is a joy. But the part which seems to me incredibly hard to play, night after night, is that of the wife, who is slowly being driven insane by her husband. Miss Judith Evelyn does a very fine piece of acting, but I should think she would be exhausted afterwards.

I have several appointments today besides the main ones, a lunch with the Division of General Education of New York University, and a meeting in the afternoon with the New York Section of the American Camping Association.

Just before he left for Rio de Janeiro, Dr. L.S. Rowe, Director General of the Pan-American Union, announced that the students of 21 American Republics have been invited to make a study of Inter-American affairs, as part of the Hemisphere Forum which the Pan-American Union is sponsoring. They are to meet in discussion groups in their respective countries and then submit papers on the subject "What Inter-American Cooperation Means To My Country."

Two four-year university scholarships are offered for the best papers submitted, one for the papers written in Spanish, Portuguese or French, and one for the papers written in English. These paper must be in by April 14, 1942, and all high school students are eligible. There are other cash prizes also to be given. Those winning the two scholarships will have to spend at least two years studying in a country other than their own.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL