My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Monday—Yesterday morning, two children, who were staying in the house, decided they would like to go to see the Unknown Soldier's Tomb, so we took them there and to Rock Creek Cemetery to see St. Gaudens' Memorial. To me, that memorial is one of the most beautiful things in Washington, in snow or sunshine.

I said my prayers of thankfulness and of hope, with my eyes fixed on that strangely enigmatic woman's face. She lived a full life, I am sure, but I am never quite certain whether she just became resigned, or whether life gave her a complete and peaceful contentment.

Back for luncheon, after which some of our guests left, so that I spent a fairly quiet two hours in my sitting room before Mrs. Aymar Johnson came in with some English children who are staying with her. Later, about fifteen political science students from Mt. Holyoke, with their teacher, Miss Victoria Schuck, came to see me.

They asked a number of questions and I arranged for them to go to the Office of Civilian Defense to find out all they could about our work. Miss Jane Seaver, of our youth activities division, came to us from Mt. Holyoke, so I am sure they found a friend and made use of the Washington Bureau of the International Student Service also.

Last evening, in addition to my own broadcast, I presided at the American Forum of the Air, and enjoyed the audience as well as the galaxy of speakers. I thought it very remarkable that each one was able to make such a valuable contribution on the subject of unity in such short speeches.

I reached the Office of Civilian Defense this morning at 9:00 o'clock and was in the middle of a staff meeting when the White House telephone rang. I found myself talking to Franklin, Jr., back from the seas. He was in hopes of getting leave but was not very sure. Since then he has told me that he can not have leave this time, which will be a blow to Ethel, who is very anxious to show him the baby.

I was so glad to hear his voice for he has been gone two months, a long time not to know the whereabouts of the young people you care about. He was fairly bubbling over because he found that he had been promoted, so he has taken his first step up the ladder.

A very busy day and three of us ate lunch together at my desk. I barely managed to reach home in time to get this column off.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL