My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—This has been a busy day. Beginning with a meeting this morning at 9 o'clock at the Office of Civilian Defense, I had no free minutes until I was back at the White House at 12:15, to meet and be photgraphed with Miss Margaret Hamma, the world's champion typist. Then I went to the Women's National Press Club luncheon.

In spite of my membership in this club, I rarely manage to get there for lunch. Tuesdays come and go and there always seems to be something desperately necessary to be done at home. There was a time when I occasionally went out for lunch or tea, but that is now past and I nearly always make people come to me to save time.

At 2:30 I went to the sale for United China relief, received a group of 10 people at the White House a little after 3, and made a 4 o'clock plane for New York City.

I shall be in New York City a little more than 24 hours, since I am speaking tonight at Hunter College and tomorrow at noon at New York University. Tomorrow evening I attend the Night of Stars performances in Madison Square Garden for the benefit of United Palestine Appeal. Thursday morning I shall be back at my desk here.

I received an interesting little folder the other day sent out by the Community Service Society in New York City. It describes their employment service, which is largely devoted to placing people who, for one reason or another, have lost confidence in their own ability to hold a job. This is a difficult service because it is hard to find the right conditions and the right people to work together, so that the person to be rehabilitated will finally feel capable of standing on his own feet.

Too many people are classed as unemployables. With a little care and patience they might have found their own niche in the world, and been able to carry on a useful existence. The Community Service has been successfully meeting this situation and I think it is interesting to know that they obtain their jobs to a very great extent from people who have employed some of their "cases" before and are willing to take a chance again.

They state: "Fortunately, we find that few people can be labelled once and for all as unemployables. They show an encouraging tendency to refuse to stay put in any such category."

I find it increasingly difficult to feel either elated or depressed by the news which comes to us from the actual theaters of war. When I read one dispatch, the Nazis claim continuing victories. When I read another, the other side has moved forward without any set-backs. I now just pray that I can believe the things which I want to believe, and try to forget the rest.

E. R.
PNews, LBI, 29 November 1941