My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GREENVILLE, N.C., Monday—We arrived in Wilson, N. C., and were met by Dr. Leon R. Meadows, president of East Carolina Teachers College. The state highway patrol preceded us on the thirty odd mile drive to Greenville. They had evidently decided that I was an old lady with nerves and did not like to be driven at more than 30 miles an hour, so we drove at a snail's pace. I was about to ask what was the matter, and then decided that it was not up to me to ask questions and I had better take advantage of the opportunity to look at the countryside.

I remembered well that this is the part of the country which had been hardest hit when the war closed its tobacco markets, because of the sudden decision by Great Britain that it could not buy tobacco over here. Almost 50 percent of the tobacco raised here, used for cigarettes, had been sold in England. Before the Japanese-Chinese war, much of it was sold to China.

The Government helped the planters over this period. In one way it has had a beneficial effect, for through their state agricultural college, they have received assistance in establishing a more varied agriculture. You now see fields of corn, a little cotton and gardens. Mayor Sugg, of Greenville, who drove over with us, told me he had attended a meeting recently on home canning, which had really been inspiring.

I was glad to hear of this, for it seems that the nutrition program is working. I feel that if we can establish community planning for specific purposes during this period, we shall have a stronger instrument with which to meet any problems which face our communities in the future.

The members of the press are to be here to see me at 12:00 o'clock. Luncheon will be at 1:00, after which we shall drive around the campus, visit the NYA community center, and I hope also to see the WPA art gallery, which is located in the Greenville Public Library. This being WPA Art Week, I want, wherever possible, to see the local exhibitions. In this way I shall obtain a better idea of what artistic talent and craftsmanship we are developing in various localities.

On the 11th day of each month, the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States have established a radio program to which more than 425 radio stations are contributing time. They call their program "Speak Up For Democracy." I have had the privilege of looking over some of their material, and I want to congratulate them on the service which they are rendering to the cause of liberty.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL