My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—Miss Caroline Haslett, Honorary Advisor to the British Ministry of Labor on Women's Training, came to lunch with me yesterday and told me of their plans to invite some women of various organizations in this country to visit England, and then report back to the people of this country on the work being done by women over there.

It certainly will be a great help to civilian defense, but I hope the women will be very carefully chosen, so that they will reach as wide a field as possible on their return.

I left Washington on the 4:00 o'clock plane, flew to New York City to attend a meeting in the evening, after which I spent some hours going over all the mail which I had not succeeded in doing earlier in the day.

The trip up on the plane was particularly pleasant because Mr. Edward J. Flynn, the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, was with me and talked on many subjects of mutual interest. When I did take to reading my papers, which I had been carrying around with me all day, it was an added interest to be able to comment on various matters and to ask questions of my well-informed neighbor.

At 9:30 this morning, a Boy Scout, rather breathless because he had been delayed in arriving, a Sea Scout and a Cub Scout, were at my door. A truck half piled up with papers stood outside. I took out a stack of old newspapers and we all faced the camera men together.

I had to beg them to hurry because I found the papers heavy. When they were taken over by the Boy Scout, I realized that he must find them just as heavy. Finally, they were safely on the truck. After signing three autographs, everybody departed happily.

Since then I have done a variety of things, and since variety is the spice of life, this has been a spicy day.

"Bundles For Britain" has a most enchanting "All America" shop, where I am sure many people will find unique Christmas gifts.

The head, done by Mr. Robert Bros, of the President, which is on exhibition in Mr. Frey's gallery, seems to me very fine.

The Child Study Association lunch was most interesting. Dr. Eduard C. Lindeman told us of the purposes of the organization and introduced Dr. David Levy, who gave a learned paper on hate and intolerance. Dr. Everett R. Clinchy, closed with a convincing plea for us to prove the possibility of unity, in spite of creed and religious differences.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL