My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—All day yesterday, from 10:00 o'clock until after 5:00, the heads of many women's national organizations met at the Labor Department Auditorium.

Miss Eloise Davison, who has been lent to the Office of Civilian Defense by the N. Y. Herald Tribune, and who is in charge of all plans for women's activities, arranged this meeting. I think it was one of the most interesting that I have ever attended.

The speeches given in the morning by the various government officials were informative and interesting, and brought home many facts we need to know if we are going to do constructive work in our communities. I do not feel that we can overemphasize the importance of coordinating all of our resources on a community basis to serve us now and in the future.

A strange report comes to me from New England. It appears that volunteers are reluctant to go to work unless they can do some work which is distinctly a war-time occupation. They do not realize that improving social services in a community is basic defense work. Every time any volunteer takes a course in nutrition or child care, and sees that the community as a whole is better fed, she has done something which will be invaluable if we are attacked, and useful in the future as well.

After the meeting, everyone came to drink tea and coffee at the White House and to talk over the day. The consensus of opinion was that Miss Davison had provided a very stimulating program.

In the evening, my cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Robinson and some other friends, went with me to see a new play, "Junior Miss." It is light and amusing and I can think of no better way to take your mind off serious matters. In Lenore Lonergan, I am beginning to look for the perfect "enfant terrible." It must be almost second nature for her to play these parts. My only other friend in the cast, Mr. Alexander Kirkland, seemed to me to do his part very well. In fact, the whole cast was good, though there were a few individuals I hope are not really true to life!

November 10th to 16th has been designated as American Guide Week, because it represents the end of six years of work, done by thousands of anonymous American writers on the writer's project of WPA. They have been doing research work and writing histories of our states and cities, which make up a story of the nation. The 51st guide book is now out and the series is complete.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL