My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—At luncheon yesterday, Miss Mary Winslow brought two very delightful guests, Senorita Graciela Mandujano, of Chile, and Senora Ana Rosa de Martinez-Guerrero from the Argentine. Senorita Mandujano, whom I have had the pleasure of meeting before, has travelled in many parts of the United States since her arrival here last spring, so she must now feel quite at home in our country. She has just spent some time in Maine and announced to me that she had become a Republican.

Senora de Martinez-Guerrero brought me an interesting scroll signed by many of the women of Buenos Aires who have joined together to aid the women in other countries who are fighting Nazism. They call their organization "Junta de la Victoria." Senora de Martinez-Guerrero, who is a very charming young woman, has lately been interested in building a hospital. I have long known that the control and the management of the hospitals in the Argentine are in the hands of the women. I have often wondered if the contact with problems in the hospital would not someday create a situation where the women would wish to prevent certain things instead of waiting to alleviate them when they reach the hospital stage. Much to my interest, Senora de Martinez-Guerrero said yesterday that she had decided that the only way to do this was through a more active interest on the part of women in the government, and that she was beginning to talk to other women along these lines. This is interesting, not only from the point of view of what it might mean internally, but of what it would mean in better understanding and cooperation between the women of the Americas.

Senator Caraway from Arkansas, with two gentlemen from her state, also came to lunch. They were very cordial in their invitation to me to come to their college for commencement next May. Heaven knows what I will find myself doing next May, so my answer was somewhat vague, but I did appreciate the effort the gentlemen made and particularly Mrs. Caraway's kindness in coming with them.

Yesterday afternoon I saw Mrs. George V. Ferguson, a most interesting woman, who has headed a voluntary participation bureau in Winnipeg, Canada. They have carried on there some very interesting projects, but I doubt if we in our country can do exactly the same kind of thing. Their experience, however, should be very helpful to us. She also invited me to come to the meeting of the Junior League in Kansas City next spring, so my calendar would be filling up, you see, if I had the temerity to plan so far ahead. I have decided, however, that life is too uncertain to make definite engagements, beyond those I already have made, to give three lectures on the West Coast and to visit my children some time in the month of April.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL