My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday —Well, after twenty-five years a woman has succeeded in winning the world's typing championship, which has been held by the men over that long period. On Monday, Oct. 6, the Business and Professional Women's Clubs of New York will make an award to Miss Margaret Hamma in recognition of her winning this trophy.

As a typist Miss Hamma belongs to the largest individual group of business women. The business and professional women who are honoring her represent every type of business and profession in which women may engage today. I think all women are honored when a woman achieves an outstanding success and I want to congratulate Miss Hamma.

Friday morning I went for a brief time to address the School of Philosophy, which is a group of employees in the Forest Service who gather to discuss their own work and to understand better some of the objectives of the department. They assigned me quite a subject: "Has Democracy a Universal, Workable Philosophy of Human Relationship in a Complex World?" I only hope I was able to contribute something to their course.

The rest of Friday I spent in seeing people in the Office of' Civilian Defense. It is very difficult to do much in the way of planning, when I am still spending the greater part of my time talking with people for periods ranging from fifteen minutes to a half hour. I find myself still reading the mail for this office and any information or questions which come in during the night. I wonder that my secretary does not rebel at the hieroglyphics which she has to decipher on the various letters and bulletins in the morning.

Friday evening I went to St. Elizabeth's Hospital, in Washington, to speak to the graduating class of nurses. They were such a nice group of young people. Most of them were girls, but there were a few men scattered among them. These girls are going to be nurses for mental cases, many of them staying in St. Elizabeth's. I think this work requires better training and more self-control and kindness than almost any other work one can do.

We all got off the train yesterday morning in New York City and went straight to the Sixty-Fifth Street houses, where my husband sorted many articles in his mother's house.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL