My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—Messages have poured in to the President from every part of the world as well as from every corner of the United States. In many cases it is impossible to find the addresses of some of the kind people.

I know that it will not be possible adequately to acknowledge these expressions of sympathy and understanding, and so I want to express to all those who read this column the President's deep appreciation, as well as my own, for this outpouring of kindly sympathy.

A loss of this kind always reminds people of their own losses, and they are full of understanding and express their feelings in many kindly ways. Probably the best thing that can happen to anyone at a time of personal loss is to be drawn back to work by a job that has to be done. If something must be done that requires concentration, that takes the individual out of himself, it is the best antidote for grief that I know.

We were up early this morning, since Johnny and Anne left for Boston at 6:30. He has finished his exams, but he is still attached to the Boston school until Friday and had to report today.

Jimmy, Rommie, Elliott and Ruth left last night after an early supper to fly back from New York City to Washington, since Jimmy and Elliott both had to be at work this morning.

Franklin and Ethel's little boy, Franklin III, arrived late yesterday afternoon to stay until Ethel gets settled for the winter. He has been at Hyde Park a good deal and my mother-in-law was devoted to him. He was very fond of her, in fact, he would mimic the way she called him when she came to see him last winter. He has been told that she has gone away for a long time, but for a while at least, I am sure he will miss her in the house.

At 1 o'clock today, my husband and I will start back to Washington. If circumstances permit, I shall come back fairly soon to attend to many details before the President returns to Hyde Park. It is extraordinary how many details there are and how many lives are affected by the passing of an older person. I suppose that must always be the case, because the longer one lives and draws people into one's own orbit, the more interests one is bound to have.

PNews, SHJ, 11 September 1941