My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—I have just finished reading a book by Mrs. Elizabeth von Hesse called: "So To Speak," which was published on August 20th. I think it will be of great assistance to everyone interested in improving his ability to think on his feet and speak effectively. There are many quotations in it which are delightful and I was particularly struck by one or two poems by Maxeda von Hesse, the daughter of the author.

I hope this book will be widely read. It gives good advice for our physical and mental well-being, as well as assuring to us, if we follow its advice, a more pleasing presentation of our ideas to the public.

Yesterday was a busy day in Washington. A press conference at 11:00, to which Dr. Louise Stanley of the Bureau of Home Economics, in the Department of Agriculture, brought the various samples they have developed in cotton stockings.

She then showed us some very charming models of work clothes developed for housewives and women workers on the farm and in the factory. The designs were not only practical but very attractive. Since the Department offers its designs to the trade, I hope some of these garments will be on the market shortly at attractive prices.

At noon, Mrs. Dana Backus brought Mr. William A. Dillon of Ithaca, N. Y., winner of the first prize in the national competition for a "song of the hour" sponsored by the Women's Division of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies. He wrote a song many years ago which you will remember entitled:"I Want a Girl." That song has been sung from coast to coast in many gatherings in this country.

Mr. Dillon entered this competition because he and Mrs. Dillon apparently make it a hobby to bring up young people. They have brought up eight youngsters besides their own, so the young girl who is at present growing up in their home, begged him to win this competition so she might put aside $300 towards her college fund.

Well, the $300 were won and the song is called:"Me And My Uncle Sam." I hope you will insist on hearing it. There were many other prize winners, so we shall be hearing a number of good songs that have as their object making us understand some phase of our obligations as citizens of the USA today.

Mrs. Hobby from Texas, Mr. and Mrs. John Herrick and one or two other friends lunched with me yesterday. The afternoon was taken up with appointments. At about 7:00, the Duke of Kent, and his aide, Sir Louis Greig, returned from their day's trip. Our dinner and the evening were pleasant and I said goodbye with regret to our guests.

Miss Thompson and I took the night train for New York City. The day here is going to be spent largely in going over things stored in the warehouse.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL