My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—When I reached home on Monday evening, I found Mrs. Dorothy Roosevelt and her youngest daughter, Janet, had driven from Vermont to spend the night with us. They had visited the library and had a swim, in spite of the chilly weather which persisted through this week.

We talked all evening. Yesterday morning, in spite of the rain, I sent my little niece over to the stables to try to get a ride, for she is very fond of horses. They left us at noon yesterday, to take a plane back to Detroit, Mich., and I hope that they met clearing skies and no bad weather.

Again we had to shift a party over to the big house, which I had planned to have out of doors at the cottage. The rainy weather is making this a habit with us. This party was given by a group of Democratic workers in honor of Mrs. Edward Conger, who has been vice president of our Democratic county committee for a long while.

She has given active and devoted service, not only doing work here in this county, but being called upon often to speak in nearby counties and to help with organization. Mrs. Conger has many loyal friends and, since she feels she must resign because of ill health, we felt we wanted to do something to show our appreciation of her services.

The party was a great success and I hope she enjoyed it as much as we enjoyed having an opportunity to see her and thank her for the inspiration she has given us over a long period.

A little after 5:00, Miss Thompson and I were on our way to New York City. We had dinner at our little apartment and then drove out to LaGuardia Field to take the 10:00 o'clock plane to Washington. The difference between standard time and daylight time makes it very pleasant when one is going southward. I reached the White House a little before 11:00 o'clock and was able to have a real chat with the President.

After all the happenings of the last few weeks, it was quite exciting. Our son, Jimmy, and his wife were fortunately still there, but they have found a little house and are moving soon. I was glad to have them with us, so that we could all have breakfast together this morning and catch up on the family news.

Coming back to Washington just at this moment, when everyone seems so busy, makes me realize that living away from the center of government activity does dull one's sense of the greatness of the struggle which is going on in the world. Reading about it in the papers, or hearing about it over the radio, is not quite the same as actually seeing people at work carrying a heavy burden on their minds and hearts all the time.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL