My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—A number of guests are coming to lunch with us today. The day began early, for we motored over to the New Hackensack flying field to see two guests off by air for New York City. The house seems a little quiet as we settle down to do some of the work which is always on our desks.

People seem to be sending me all kinds of information these days. The various fields covered give one a faint inkling of what it means to belong to a nation of 150,000,000 people, all of whom are as full of personal interests and individuality as possible.

I must have said something in my column the other day that implied that Tacoma, Wash., was not doing enough for the entertainment of the soldiers in the nearby area. A few days ago I received a wire from Mr. Bennie Crann, of the Tacoma Philharmonic Orchestra, telling me that my readers will undoubtedly be glad to know that all soldiers in uniform from Fort Lewis and Fort McChord Field, will be admitted free this month to three concerts in which Helen Jepson, Marie Louise Quevli and Mona Paulee are being presented with the orchestra at the Tacoma Stadium.

I am sure my readers are glad, just as I am, every time they hear of something which is being done in any community by any individual or by an organization to give our boys, wherever they may be, pleasure and entertainment in their hours of freedom.

However, I did not mean to imply, that all communities had not been doing whatever they could do. I simply hope that all of us will grasp every opportunity to be of service to both the families and the men in our armed forces.

I want to congratulate the Jewish Braille Review, which is celebrating its tenth anniversary this month. This magazine was founded primarily to meet the cultural and spiritual needs of the Jewish blind but it has from the first been sent free to many non-Jewish readers as well. Today there are as many Christians of various denominations as there are people of the Jewish faith enjoying this unique magazine, which serves the needs of the blind.

Helen Keller has always been one of those to whom this magazine has meant something of real value. I think all of us who realize the limitations of the blind are grateful for each thing which is done to widen the horizon of their possible activities.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL