My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I was a little late at City Hall in New York City yesterday morning because we encountered some pretty heavy showers, which always slow up my driving. As soon as I reached City Hall, the Mayor appeared and we went at once to the council room, where there was a large gathering.

I was happy to see my friend, Mr. David Dubinsky, amid a number of familiar faces. The girls who modeled the clothes and the girls who sewed in the labels were all as pretty as could be.

These labels have a real significance. They guarantee that labor conditions are good and tell every woman in the United States that she is wearing a dress designed and manufactured in New York City, which today claims to be the fashion center of the world. Mrs. Dorothy Anderson will be the Executive Director of the New York Dress Institute and I am sure that she will successfully promote the wearing of these dresses. Those shown us ranged in price from $1.95 to $295.00.

I was interested in the speed with which the girls sewed in the labels, and could see that this day was one of real excitement for them. May it also be a day which inaugurates a program providing more work for many people under better working conditions.

I joined the Mayor and drove up to the opening of the Soldiers and Sailors Club at 99 Park Avenue. This is to be a central bureau of information where any soldier, sailor, marine or aviator can find out what is planned and available in recreation along the lines of his particular interests. Today the lucky boys, fifty strong, who faced us, were all turned over to very pretty girls, who drew the names of their partners out of the Mayor's hat. They then went off to show their escorts the town.

Mr. John Golden was on hand. I discovered he was responsible for arranging to let them all see the play, "Claudia," last night. I hope they enjoyed it as much as I did when I saw it in Washington.

After lunch, I went to the Hotel Astor to see a collection of women's clothes, which a group of English manufacturers have brought over for sale to our big shops. They certainly have some perfectly delightful materials, which I am sure were made in Scotland. It is extraordinary that, in spite of all they have been through, they can still turn out clothes carefully made and showing no sign of being made under unusual conditions. They presented me with a dress they had made for me and brought over. It is very charming and I know I shall enjoy wearing it.

We returned to Hyde Park through the rain. Some friends came to dinner, and so ended a busy day. Now we are starting off with my mother-in-law to drive to Boston, Massachusetts.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL