My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FITCHBURG, Mass.—Friday afternoon we went to Eastport, Maine, and did our last bit of shopping. We still found many things we wanted simply did not exist within Eastport and had to think up substitutes.

You have no idea how ingenious you can be when you are shopping for things you want and they are not forthcoming. There were no more scrapbaskets, so I found some very nice bushel baskets, designed, I think, for packing apples, but with paper in the bottom. They will do nicely as scrapbaskets.

If you can't get pillows of one size, you take them in any sizes that are available. If you can't find a ready-made cover for the ironing board, you buy canton flannel and sheeting to make it.

After the shopping was over, we went up the Denny River in Captain Cline's little boat and explored Great South Bay. We entered a narrow passage into which, years ago, I remember my husband taking the "Half Moon." On that occasion, we had to turn around, but this boat was so much smaller, we were able to circle the island and it was a beautiful trip.

We were about twenty minutes from home when, suddenly, a cloud above us opened and we were thoroughly soaked in five minutes. It was so cold that even with a sweater and homespun coat, I could hardly wait to get home and warm up by the fire. My cousin, Mrs. Adams, and her daughter, came in for a few minutes in the evening to say goodbye. Yesterday morning, at 9:15, Miss Thompson and I started on our way home. I confess I was a little disappointed not to be able to wait to see all the young people, but we shall be returning soon.

On the drive home, we had the top of the car down. Though there was some fog in the distance, it was a beautiful trip. At Franklin Road, Me., our friends, Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Griffin, met us. We followed them to their house, which is right on the water, looking across to Mt. Desert, Maine. I must say the island played hide and seek with us in the fog, but we could see how lovely the view must be on a clear day, and I happen to like the softness of a fog blowing in and out. One of Mr. and Mrs. Griffin's daughters is to be married in a few days, so we saw some of her presents. I was particularly glad to meet the young bridegroom, Mr. Richard Herrick.

Then we started off and I disgraced myself by going off the road into the ditch and had to be pulled out. Otherwise our drive was uneventful. We spent the night in a very nice cabin, not far from Ipswich, Massachusetts. In a few minutes we are starting off, first to find breakfast, and then to visit Franklin, Jr.'s wife and little boy at Beverly Farms, Massachusetts.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL