My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO ISLAND, N.B., Friday—I woke up early yesterday morning. Perhaps it was the feel of the invigorating New England air which gave me so much energy. I used to spend a month or two quietly settled on Campobello Island for many summers, when our children were small and it is always pleasant to return there.

Yesterday morning, I had a little chat with the landlady of the cabins we stopped at outside of Portsmouth who told me that one of her sons would be eligible for the draft this year. He is working in a defense industry and may not be called, so he is thinking of volunteering. Her other son is still in school. It was interesting to find she agreed with me that, if we want a peaceful world in the future, we will have to do more than just talk about it and attend to our own affairs.

I drove into Portsmouth and had my car serviced and sent some telegrams. By the time I returned, the others had about made up their minds, I think, that I had run away and deserted them. We started at once in search of breakfast and stopped at the first place we could find. Then we drove steadily all day, except for a pleasant picnic lunch in a park which the CCC boys are arranging as a picnic area. They have built a number of buildings and are clearing the paths and parking spaces. It overlooks the water across the rocky beach and is really very beautiful. I think it will be very popular. Some other people already found their way there today, even though it is evident that it was newly opened.

We bought a newspaper in Portland and were startled by the news that Germany has made some definite demands on Russia, which would seem to make it difficult for Russia to remain on a friendly footing with her former ally. At intervals during the rest of the day, we tried to get more definite news over the radio concerning this situation. All that we could get, however, was that, in Moscow, rumors are flying about. That state of affairs is nothing new in any European country.

There is a bank of fog not very far out at sea, but the sun was kind enough to stay out and to give us a very gorgeous sunset on our arrival. The man on the ferry told us they had been having more or less foggy weather, so he thought we might be favored with some good days.

It is very nice to see so many pleasant, familiar faces. The custom officials in both Lubec, Me., and Campobello Island, N. B., treated us kindly. In no time we seemed to be settled in the house. Much must be done before the house will be ready for the many young people who are to be here for five weeks, but I think, somehow, we shall accomplish it.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL