My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—Yesterday morning, Mrs. Fayerweather and I drove out to see the horse show, which the Junior League puts on for the benefit of the Children's Hospital. This is an annual affair and there were more entrants this year than ever before. The morning was given over mainly to classes for young people, and I enjoyed seeing the boys and girls ride.

On our return I found that the senior high school students from Arthurdale, W. Va., had been shown the White House and we went out immediately to lunch under the trees in the garden. I have never seen the garden lovelier than it is this year, and yet everywhere in the East we need rain.

I cannot help wishing for pleasant weather in the midst of the season's garden parties and I confess it would be very nice if all the rain could come at night. However, we have to welcome it even when it drives us indoors, as it did yesterday afternoon. Instead of having a garden party for the members of the Democratic Women's Council of Washington, I had an indoor tea!

Before they came, we had a half hour concert given by the chorus of the New York Institute for the Education of the Blind. They sang beautifully and no one could help but be happy that this compensation of music is there when other enjoyments for them are curtailed.

I have saved until the last, a few words which I want to write about the dinner which was held by the Chi Omega National Achievement Award Committee. As I have told you before, they give a gold medal each year to a woman who is outstanding in some particular field.

This year, to my great joy, it was awarded to Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt. Women have had suffrage now for so many years, that it is easy to forget what we owe to the women who fought for our enfranchisement, who persuaded and cajoled and browbeat the gentlemen who held our destinies in their hands.

Several of the women who worked with Mrs. Catt paid tribute to her leadership and told of their own experiences. A very excellent speech was made by Dr. T. V. Smith of the University of Chicago I was happy to be granted the privilege of handing the medal to Mrs. Catt.

I want to say again in this column what I have often said before to both Mrs. Catt and to her friends, she has been an inspiration to all of us and continues to be in these times, when many of us find ourselves obliged to face situations we had hoped were gone forever. Her courage, patience, humor and perennially young outlook, which bows to new conditions and adjusts to them, are perhaps the most helpful things to see in this most confusing world.

A quiet Sunday and this afternoon I am flying over to New York City to go with three friends to the Dean Dixon concert. I return to Washington tomorrow morning.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL