My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—Yesterday afternoon I had the pleasure of having Madame Ruiz-Guinazu, wife of the Argentine Minister of Foreign Affairs, her two daughters and Madame de Espil, wife of the Argentine Ambassador, have tea with me. The girls are rather sad at having to leave so soon, for they felt they could spend a month with ease in the United States.

Madame Ruiz-Guinazu was fairly exhausted by the amount of sightseeing which they had done, but everything was of great interest to her. She spoke with enthusiasm of the National Gallery and of the beauty of our capitol city. Then she told me at length of her interest in the Congressional Library, particularly the collection of books in braille, and the new development of talking books for the blind.

Her son is in charge of this work in the Argentine. Having become blind himself at the age of seventeen, he evidently determined to lead a busy, useful and, therefore, happy life. He has written three books and is leading the way for the whole of South America in the development of opportunities for blind people.

What a wonderful thing it is to use one's handicaps, not only to enrich one's own character and personality, but to enrich the lives of others facing the same difficulties.

At 4:30 the Cabinet ladies and I lined up for the reception given to the women executives in the various government departments. We had hoped to have it out of doors, but the sky looked so threatening that we decided it was safer to stay inside.

About 1750 ladies passed by us in an hour and a half. I am always particularly happy to entertain this group, for I feel they are responsible for much of the good work done in the Government.

My friend, Mrs. Charles Fayerweather, from Lebanon, N.Y., and her son, John, are staying with me. After a quiet dinner they went out to visit some friends, while I spent the evening working at my desk and finally caught up on the mail. This morning I had a number of appointments, for as soon as I am back in Washington, people appear to remember all sorts of things they had been hoarding until my return.

At 1:00 o'clock, I am going to lunch with Mr. Edward Bruce, and others of the Commission of Fine Arts, and to see some pieces of sculpture which have been sent in for their latest competition. I always enjoy these expeditions and am amazed at the talent which has been developed and given an opportunity during the last few years.

The sun has come back to us and I am looking forward to a very delightful afternoon. First of all, I shall go to the Shoreham Hotel, where the Women's National Democratic Club is having its annual spring fete, and then to tea with the Regent and Vice Regents of the Mount Vernon Ladies Association, which is always a rare treat.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL