My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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On the train from EUGENE, Or. to PORTLAND, Or.—Yesterday began well because our friend of the Southern Pacific Lines, Mr. Lathrop, invited us to breakfast with him on the train. Our plane was a little late, but we enjoyed the trip. We flew for a time over white covered mountains and saw beautiful mountain peaks emerge around us from their enveloping clouds.

In Medford, Ore., the Twenty-Thirty Club presented me with a box of preserved salad pears, all of very beautiful colors, but a little difficult to carry under one's arm. I hope, therefore, that my daughter will let us eat them while we are with her.

The drive from Portland to Eugene was very lovely and reminded me of the country back of the Hudson River. The dean of the University of Oregon, Mr. Karl Onthank, his wife and daughter, came to meet us and were most kind and thoughtful.

I enjoyed the evening at the University, as I always do when I have an opportunity of being with young people. It was the students' evening, and so Mr. Gleeson Payne, the student body president, introduced me. A fine looking boy, and from what the dean told me about him, I felt that the future could hold few insurmountable obstacles for him because he has already met and conquered so many.

There was a short reception after the lecture period. I had an opportunity to discuss various things, including my own article in the the Ladies' Home Journal, with a group of the girls sitting in front of one of the big fireplaces, where tremendous logs burn.

This morning we left the hotel rather early and went to visit NYA resident centers. The boys' center is being built largely by the boys themselves, and many of them were at work under excellent foremen. They have a fine vocational school in Eugene functioning in cooperation with the program which Dr. John Studebaker, head of the Federal Bureau of Education, has sponsored. Here boys and girls on NYA, people on WPA, and students, are obtaining re-training. The school runs 24 hours a day and every department is run the way a business or shop would actually function.

We stopped at a girls' resident NYA house, where everyone seemed happy. It is similar to many others throughout the country and also has a sewing project.

Our train was ten minutes late and we were glad to have even these few minutes, which made it possible for us to see a little bit more before leaving Eugene. Now we are on our way back to Portland.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL