My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—It seems as though I were covering a good deal of ground these days. On Friday I had the pleasure of meeting for a few minutes Mr. Darrell Brown, the young artist who won a prize offered by Mr. Isaac Liberman, President of Arnold Constable Company, for painting a portrait of me in the dress I wore on Inauguration Night. I thought I had never seen him and, since I am not particularly interested in portraits of myself, I think I must have seemed a rather unsatisfactory subject. This, however, is a portrait of the dress. I was interested to learn that I had met Mr. Brown some years ago in Iowa, and was glad to be able to show him the Lincoln portrait in the State Dining Room, which he liked as much as we do.

In the evening, I took the train for Boston and arrived there yesterday morning with my brother to attend the wedding of my young namesake, Eleanor Roosevelt. After breakfast at the Statler with some of my brother's friends; our son John, sent a car for us and my brother and we went down to the navy yard where Franklin, Jr., met us and took us over the destroyer on which he is serving. It was all most interesting and I was glad to meet some of his brother officers.

Franklin, Jr., was off duty by lunch time, so we all had lunch together at Johnny and Anne's apartment. Johnny was one of the ushers at the wedding and, as usual, he was most efficient. We went out to Mrs. John Cutter's house in time to see all the wedding party being photographed out on the lawn, and to look at all the wedding presents.

Then we went to the church where my brother joined me and I think we all felt that it was a charming ceremony. The young people looked very happy and sweet and the sun shone upon them.

One cannot help feeling that plans for the future are very uncertain where young people are concerned these days, but this has been the case before and it is good that they have the courage to start their lives and lead them as normally as they possibly can. They cannot escape anxiety and perhaps it will have to be borne separately instead of with each other, but that, too, has come to youth in periods of crisis. I pray that we, who are older, may be able to help them during this difficult time.

I was very sorry that, on account of cancellation of my plane back last night from Boston to Washington, I had to take a train and miss the Easter Sunrise Service at the Unknown Soldier's Tomb, conducted by the Knights Templar. This is the first time, since coming to Washington, that I have missed this service.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL