My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—Our two days in the country were, on the whole, very peaceful and I think we accomplished a good deal. I was outdoors all Saturday morning looking at trees and planning where to put in shrubs and plants, both at the President's cottage and my own. By noon it began to rain really hard and so, at two-thirty, I did not regret delivering a speech indoors at Vassar College to a group of girls.

I saw a good many of my neighbors and read a good many things which I have been carrying around in my brief case for some time. I was back in New York City on Sunday by 5:00 o'clock and went to the Sunday evening supper of the Men's Faculty Club at Columbia University.

It seemed rather presumptious to address people on a subject as large as: "What is really happening in the United States Today," many of whom knew much more about this subject than I possibly could. I realized however, that what I had to say was merely a preface to an open discussion.

It proved to be a very interesting evening, more profitable to me probably than to those who listened to me start it off! President and Mrs. Nicholas Murray Butler were kind enough to come to supper and I enjoyed seeing them very much.

I took the night train back to Washington. We have a most beautiful day here, so I am happy to be driving down to Annapolis to address the Women's Club. I have had the pleasure of doing this almost every spring for the last few years.

There opened in New York City yesterday, an exhibit at the Julien Levy Gallery of the work of Tamara de Lempicka. On April 18th, the receipts of the exhibit admission charge will be devoted to the Paderewski Fund, so that those who are interested in that fund should try to see the exhibit on that particular day.

There is an editorial in "Common Sense" for this month, which I think will do a valuable service in stimulating thought and argument. It is entitled "Whose Sacrifice?" I am going to quote one thought here: "Sacrifice is indeed called for. But it is the sacrifice of the old methods of unplanned, competitive, monopoly profit-seeking business, and not the sacrifice of the bread and butter of the poor."

That is a large statement with which many people will agree wholeheartedly. The difference always arises as to how we shall achieve the ends which almost any one will concede are desirable. The editorial makes some valuable suggestions. Some of the statements are open to argument. But, after all, the value of anything which is written lies largely in its challenge to further thought and study. I hope a great many people after reading this month's "Common Sense," will do some constructive thinking.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL