My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—I did not have space yesterday to tell you anything about the annual dinner given by the Woman's National Press Club. This is a most entertaining party and if I weren't called upon to make a speech at the end, I should enjoy every minute of it. Last year I promised myself that if I were able to attend the party this year, I would not be sitting at the speakers' table. I would be completely carefree, with perhaps a little sense of superiority towards those who carried the responsibility of speaking before this gifted group of women. But here I was again, listening intently to everything said on the stage, knowing that at the end I had to answer as best I could what quips or friendly jibes had been made at my expense!

Despite this sense of responsibility, I really enjoy this party very much and look forward to it from year to year. The imposing list of honor guests shows that many other people do too.

We had several ladies staying with us and I think the gentlemen of the household felt rather relieved when they found that their only obligation was to entertain us for a brief moment before dinner. Then my husband, Mr. Hopkins and Jimmy had dinner alone and a chance afterwards to work or to talk as they saw fit.

Next week the Gridiron Club party will take place and the gentlemen will be in the forefront over the weekend!

Yesterday morning I left Washington for New York City to keep a dental appointment at noon, followed by the luncheon of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress. In the afternoon I spoke to the Open-Air Teachers Association of the New York City Department of Education. Then I had the pleasure of a visit with my mother-in-law.

Today I have several appointments. Among others, I am going to try on an Easter suit. I was asked in my press conference on Tuesday what I had chosen for this year and I could not remember, so it is time I gave a little thought to this matter of feminine adornment!

This afternoon I go to a meeting of the Council for Student Equality, at New York University. Tonight I preside at a dinner for the Common Council for American Unity.

I always think when I come up to New York that I am going to have ample time to do a great many things which I should like to do, such as seeing art exhibitions and really getting a chance to talk with some of my old friends. For the most part, however, in the end I find myself doing many semi-official duties and thrusting personal affairs into the background. Someday all this will be changed and I only hope that my personal friends will have the patience to bear with me during the interval and that they will not forget the old ties.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL