My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—After returning to the train on Monday afternoon, the President and I had a chance to catch up on the details of his fishing trip. I found that he was very proud that he had been able to prove that trolling from the Potomac was not only possible, but very profitable! I also discovered that the party had some rather rough days and that one of the chief sufferers, a small dog named Fala, kept his master awake most of one night! Fala, however, seemed to have forgotten whatever hardships he had been through and he greeted me as warmly as any other member of the party. He jumped up on the sofa beside me and demanded a great deal of attention.

As the train pulled out of the Fort Bragg area, they fired the President's salute and Fala stood with his paws on the window of the back door of the car and as each gun went off he sniffed the air as much as to say: "What new thing is happening that I don't understand?" They tell me he enjoyed the fishing trip very much when it was smooth, and as soon as the President would say: "Catch a fish now," his ears would perk up and he would stand expectantly waiting for a fish to be landed. Then, as it flopped on the deck, he would retire a few feet, gather his courage and dash up to inspect it, only to retreat with the next flop. This was an amusement for Fala, perhaps, but as far as I could find out, it was much more amusement for all the men on board.

The President, Miss Thompson and I had dinner together and everyone went to bed fairly early. Our son, Jimmy, was down at the station to greet us yesterday morning and soon after breakfast at the White House, Franklin, Jr., came in. He and Jimmy had lunch with their father and I got what glimpses I could of them in the intervals between a press conference and an hour spent at the National Women's Democratic Club, at the opening of an "information course." I talked for a little while on the place of women in defense and then answered questions for the remainder of the time. Mrs. Thomas McAllister was there, back in Washington for the newspaper women's stunt party last night. She drove back with me and so we had a few minutes of quiet talk. Then Miss Winifred C. Cullis, an English acquaintance who had stayed with us some years ago in Albany, N. Y., came to lunch with several other friends.

At two o'clock, Franklin Jr., left again by plane for New York City as he goes to Boston tomorrow to report on Thursday aboard the destroyer to which he has been assigned. He and Jimmy and I were talking about the uncertainties as to the length of service in the reserves, and I was interested to find how calmly they are taking the need for adjustment to whatever situations may have to be faced. It is the kind of spirit we must all develop and I rather think the younger generation is going to be better in doing it than their elders.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL