My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—The young people who came here yesterday afternoon from the Lawrenceville, N. J., school, were most interested in what they saw. They spent the morning visiting the Supreme Court, the Senate and the House.

One of the boys is going to come down for the summer to work in a New Jersey Congressman's office. I suggested mildly that I did not consider Washington a perfect summer resort, but that did not dampen his ardor in the least. I hope he will find much to interest him.

Mr. John Brainerd McHarg, from Rochester, N. Y., showed me some beautiful slides yesterday afternoon. His hobby is taking colored photographs and developing uses in the teaching field for these slides on all types of subjects.

A few friends came to dinner last night. This morning I was glad to awaken to a beautiful day, for we are off by plane to Miami, Florida, where we are going to spend a very peaceful week, I hope.

I have a letter from an English woman which I am quoting here in part:" As an English woman, may I say how much I appreciate the great kindness and generosity shown by the people of the U.S.A. in our war effort. It is an inspiration to know that we have such friends... We will stand the blood and tears if your great country will share the sweat. My son, who is a 'Worcester' cadet, goes to sea in May (he will still be not quite seventeen) My husband is an enthusiastic member of the home guard. Our two countries seem to be agreed on one great point—that the leader of this world is not named Hitler and that his book is not called "Mein Kampf." There is tremendous hope and faith in that for the future."

This is one of the many which have come to me expressing gratitude for the help which American citizens have sent them. I think there has been very generous giving on the part of our people to all the various charities which have undertaken to do a variety of work for the sufferers in Europe.

I wish, however, we could succeed in doing for every group what is now being attempted in the Chinese charities. There they are coordinating and raising their funds jointly. I imagine the central body representing all the different interests will decide, as the money comes in, where it should be allocated according to the needs.

This is a plan which I should like to see followed by all other groups, particularly in the case of those doing work for Great Britain. From the point of view of shipping, it is so important that no space should be taken up by anything which is not really needed in Great Britain at the present time.

The money which is available, should be spent on the things which are going to be of the greatest help at the moment. These needs change and a central group, constantly in touch with the people in England, as well as the agencies here, would be in a better position to decide than any one individual charity. It means, of course, a sinking of individual preferences and personalities in the interest of doing what is most needed at a particular moment. This is difficult to do, but I hope we can achieve it.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL