My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—On leaving the very pleasant lunch given by Mrs. Frank Walker yesterday, I went to the Calvary Baptist Church, where an afternoon seminar on the migratory worker was going on under the auspices of the National Christian Mission. The churches have been working for some time on this problem; and I feel it is a very good thing for all of us, no matter to what special denomination we may belong, to join in work which translates into action the spiritual beliefs we hold.

Over the banisters, as I came out of the church, a little old lady called to me in French. I answered her in her own language, for I think one must have a hunger sometimes, when in a foreign land, to hear other people talk the language of your birth.

From there I went to receive a watch from Mr. William V. C. Ruxton, President of the British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc. A duplicate of the one given to me is being sent to Queen Elizabeth, and these watches with the insignia of the RAF are going to be on sale at local jewelers all over the country for the benefit of this committee. Here in Washington they are trying to raise $25,000—the first $1,000 was handed to Mr. Ruxton today for the purchase of a flying ambulance to pick up aviators shot down at sea.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hawkins of Reno, Nevada, arrived to spend last night with us, and we had the usual small dinner preceding the Congressional Reception. After the reception was over, Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and I left on the night train for New York. We breakfasted in my apartment in New York and at 9:00 o'clock Miss Rose Schneiderman of the Women's Trade Union League joined us there. We started at once for Greenpoint, Brooklyn, where I had promised to speak for a few minutes to the girls who have been on strike at the Leviton factory for a great many weeks.

We are now starting on our drive to Amherst, Massachusetts. Both of us are armed with furcoats and warm clothes, though I confess it seemed impossible to believe in Washington that it could really be cold up here.

We have had a warm winter so far in Washington and I have been able to sleep with both my bedroom windows open. My bed stands between them, so when the wind blows I sometimes am awakened in the middle of the night by swishing curtains over my face and shades and papers blowing off my night table!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL