My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—On Friday afternoon, I attended a Girl Scout ceremony in the DAR National Headquarters. This was a birthday celebration at which they presented the work of their service bureaus in tableaux which showed what the girls can do in national defense. The climax was reached when they handed me a blank check, drawn to the order of the People of The United States, on the hours of their service.

In the evening, I went to a meeting called by a group of people who wanted to consider the advisability of forming a municipal assembly in the District of Columbia. I was astonished at the number of organizations existing in the District. Many of them are civic organizations which are federated and which, if they agreed on any one thing ought to be able to bring a great deal of influence to bear on the District government and the committees in Congress which deal with District matters.

Since I am only a temporary resident of the District, I feel that I have very little right to take part in anything affecting the citizens of the District, except as the District is of importance and interest to any citizen of the United States. Where the District institutions are concerned, I have always felt that all citizens should take an interest in having here, models for the rest of the country; both for the value it would be to us in carrying back suggestions to our own States and communities, and because of the service we could render to observers from other countries. I have always found that I could learn things from other countries and would like to feel that we offered here our best in every field in the hope that we might be useful.

The people of the District must decide whether a municipal assembly would be a good instrument for them. I was certainly impressed by the number of organizations there seem to be in the District, and the small results they seem to achieve.

After this meeting, I attended the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Birthday Ball, which like all the others, seemed to be better attended than last year.

Yesterday, Mrs. Montgomery Angell and I, with her two children made a trip to Monticello. They stopped first at Mt. Vernon, and then I joined them. We were fortunate in having a beautiful day, which made a picnic lunch possible. After visiting Jefferson's home, which is always a joy to me, the children came back to Washington, while Mrs. Angell and I went to Richmond, Va., to attend a meeting of the newly organized Southern Electoral Reform League. I hope they will be successful in Virginia in having the poll tax removed, for I always feel that the State of Virginia should be a leader in all reforms.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL