My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—It was sad indeed to see my daughter and her husband leave yesterday afternoon, but we had had a delightful time together. I can look forward to a real visit with them again in the spring in Seattle, when I shall see the children as well. Perhaps the nicest things come to us only occasionally to keep us from becoming spoiled!

I returned to a very pleasant few minutes at tea with Mrs. Leigh-White. She is on her way to South America to further the organization of Girl Scouts. I think this is a very important tour and Mrs. Leigh-White, who is an Englishwoman and has been interested for many years in the international aspects of the Girl Scout movement, is doing the whole organization a great service by undertaking it.

Mrs. William Brown Meloney also arrived at tea time to stay a few days and it is wonderful to have her well enough for a visit. In the evening, the President and I, with quite a large party, attended the benefit performance for the Infantile Paralysis Fund given by Miss Jane Cowl and her company in their play: "Old Acquaintance."

We all enjoyed the play. It is well cast, both Miss Cowl and Miss Wood play their parts so that you almost forget you are not actually living through the scenes. The lines are delightful and it is gay in spite of the acceptance of the fact that one can't get away from suffering. I have never been much of a believer in dramatic self-sacrifice, so I could not help enjoying Kit's remark to Deidre: "And what good will it do?"

They all came back to supper and we had a very pleasant time together.

Because the weather looked threatening and I had to start for New Haven, Conn., at 2:00 o'clock, I decided to take the train up to New York City last night. Here I spent a quiet morning and am now off on a busy afternoon and evening and another night train back to Washington.

I wonder if any of my readers are familiar with the research program which has been carried on during the past six years by Mr. Charles F. Reid of the College of the City of New York. He has been building up a bibliography of the territories and outlying possessions of the United States of America. This project has a bearing on national defense for it secures information which is of strategic and military value to the national program.

These bibliographies should really be in every public library, school and college in the country. A greater knowledge of the Panama Canal and our outlying possessions will enable our citizens to understand better the problems of national defense. The editor has done this monumental work as a labor of love, and I hope that librarians and teachers are going to be interested in the project because of its educational value.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL