My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—Yesterday afternoon, the first party opening the infantile paralysis drive was held here at the White House. Decorations designed by Mr. Lester Gaba were used for the table. These decorations can be carried out for any small party which any woman may be able to give in her own home for a small group of friends. I hope that many women will feel an interest in having parties for the purpose of helping the children who have suffered from infantile paralysis in the past, or who may suffer in the future.

Mrs. Claude Wickard, wife of the Secretary of Agriculture, and Miss Grace Moore took part in the broadcast before we had tea. I think the most appealing and effective person in the room and on the air was Delores Francis, about eight years old, who was a victim at the age of four months. She showed what care and gallantry of spirit will do in the way of rehabilitation, and spoke clearly and simply.

Immediately after tea, I went over to the place outside of the National Broadcasting Company Building, where the "Mile of Dimes" was started and spoke a few words over the radio. They tell me that there are thirty other cities in which "Mile of Dimes" programs are being arranged this year.

This morning I went to the Children's Hospital for the photographs and movies of the work which is being done there. These are used in the infantile paralysis drive.

There are two appointments before lunch and then I shall have the pleasure of lunching with Mrs. Frank Knox, wife of the Secretary of the Navy. This lunch was postponed because I wanted to go to meet my children on their arrival at Hyde Park last weekend. I am still grateful for Mrs. Knox's understanding of my desire to be in the country for two days with the children when they arrived in the East.

Yesterday I had a delightful time with Mrs. Robert Jackson, wife of the Attorney General. This seems to be a week of lunches with the Cabinet ladies.

The National Conference of Christians and Jews has just notified me that the week of February 22nd to 28th, 1941, will be designated as the Eighth Annual Brotherhood Week; when Protestants, Catholics and Jews in over 2,000 communities will join together to consider how best to maintain this country, "one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

Let us hope that the spirit which has built this country will remain with us always and that we shall never forget that people of all races and religions have made our nation strong and that only by remaining united can we remain so.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL