My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday —I wrote so much about my two aunts yesterday that I said little about the rest of our weekend. My mother-in-law was in Hyde Park to prepare for the family reunion, and on Saturday Franklin, Jr., and Ethel appeared. We were disappointed, for we expected Elliott and Major Early to fly to West Point and hoped that they would also spend the night with us, but the weather grounded them in Cleveland.

It was wonderful to have two full days in the country. We walked and talked, ate too much, and slept too little; which is always the way of family reunions, for once conversation starts, time slips by unnoticed! We drove down to New York City yesterday afternoon, and I had a supper party for eight people in our small apartment. I have never gathered quite so many together there before, but everyone seemed to find some place to sit and the "arduous" labor of scrambling eggs in a chafing dish, brought me help from at least two of my children—one of them actually broke the eggs into the dish, another one sat back and talked to me while I stirred them.

I made the midnight train back to Washington and was delighted this morning to find our guests, Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Mann, and their daughter, at breakfast.

At my press conference, Mrs. Marie Dresden Lane, director of the girls and professional projects for the National Youth Administration, came over to tell us something of the health program which the NYA is expanding. They expect to establish two experimental camps near medical centers, where some of the boys rejected by the draft board, will be taken in to find out whether their difficulties can be remedied, so that they can enter the service.

It seems to me that the medical records which will be available as a result of the physical examinations which are being given the boys, should be of great value in guiding our policy for the health programs in our communities.

I was a little late for Mrs. Lawrence Townsend's concert this morning and had to leave before the last number, but I enjoyed every minute while I was there. Mr. Arthur Rubinstein and Mr. Zlatko Balokovic gave us an hour and a half of excellent music.

At luncheon in the White House, I was very glad to assemble a number of people interested in the development of our relationships with our sister republics in this hemisphere. Mr. Frank Gilmore came down to tell us how keenly interested he is in making the theatre one of the avenues for developing goodwill. I think every one present was interested in his idea.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL