My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Friday—Yesterday I gave the luncheon which is given every year in honor of the wives of the members of the Supreme Court. Mrs. William Howard Taft, as usual, was my co-hostess across the table, and Mrs. Stone and Mrs. Roberts sat on either side of me.

Mrs. Roberts and I discovered that we had an equal enthusiasm for farming and country life. It is curious what a bond a farm can be. Though I have nothing to do with the management of my mother-in-law's farm at Hyde Park, I have learned much from her. Cows, particularly if you have the same brand, seem to provide an endless subject of conversation.

Dogs and horses draw people together in exactly the same way. I have always felt that anyone who was really liked by dogs could be counted on to have certain decent qualities in human relationships.

The President's little dog notices that the bags are out and we are planning to go somewhere today. He is just as excited as a child. Someone remarked this morning that he was the "waggingest" puppy they had ever seen, which describes him quite well because he seems to wag his whole body as well as his tail when he is excited.

The "Quiz-Kids" of radio fame, called on me yesterday afternoon. Though I always supposed they must be very learned children, they really looked quite normal and natural. I told them one or two things which I thought might add to the interest of their tour around the White House and wished that I could have spent more time with them.

I had planned yesterday afternoon to go to an exhibition of paintings by Miss Elisabeth Searcy. She painted two water colors of the back of the White House last summer for me to give to the President as a Christmas gift. I wanted to see how the one I had lent her for the exhibition looked, but my afternoon filled up so rapidly that I never managed to get there. I only hope that a great many people were not as busy as I was.

I had fifteen minute appointments from 4:00 o'clock to five. Then two or three friends came in for tea, so I was not really free a single moment during the afternoon.

Last night Miss Thompson and I had dinner together and I think it was the first time we really had an opportunity for conversation in weeks. It may sound ridiculous, but the usual day is such that our communications are limited strictly to business.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL