My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, N.Y., Wednesday—We held a meeting yesterday of the committee for the National Achievement Award of the Chi Omega. In the afternoon, I had a small tea for various people who have come to Washington for one reason or another, and whom I had not had an opportunity to see.

In the evening, I attended the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra concert which was, as always, refreshing to the soul. After that, I took the night train to New York City, so that I might have a full day here. My first official appearance will be at the sale for the blind at 11:00 o'clock this morning.

While I am talking about the sale for the blind, I think I might mention an appeal which has come to me from Helen Keller on behalf of the American Rescue Ship Committee. This ship is to bring refugees from Lisbon, Portugal, to various safe ports on this side of the ocean.

More directly in line with her work for the blind is a second appeal from Miss Keller, asking for help for the Institution for the Chinese Blind. They are trying to reoccupy their school in Shanghai, which was closed because their workshop was wrecked by war conditions. If you can send something through Miss Keller, she will be grateful for a contribution to either or both of these interests.

I have just received a notice about the Christmas cards being sold by Parents Magazine. Eighty-five percent of the cost of these cards goes into a fund for needy children, sponsored by the magazine. This fund distributes the money thus raised to charitable organizations throughout the country and renders outstanding service to children in need.

This is a way in which you can buy something almost all of us need and, at the same time, do something for unfortunate little children at this time of the year, when they should be uppermost in our minds. Christmas is the feast for little children, instituted because of the birth of a little child many years ago.

More in sorrow than in anger, someone called to my attention the fact that I had said a great deal about a book called "Happy Days in Czechoslovakia," but had never mentioned another book called: "Jenik and Marenka" by Zdena Trinka. I hastenedto acquire the book and I hope that many other people will do likewise, for it is delightful reading.

I think children will enjoy it greatly. The illustrations are not quite as attractive or as distinctive as are those done by Mr. Jarka Bures in the other book, but I think you will like the one right at the beginning of a little girl feeding the ducklings. Many of the other illustrations have charm, even though they seem a less vital part of the book than those done by Mr. Bures in the other Czechoslovakian book.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL