My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—San Antonio, Texas, is a city which I think has real charm. There were two things I wanted to do there on Friday, which I did not succeed in doing, so I shall have to go back there before long. Mayor Maury Maverick has been rebuilding an old section of the city which I wanted very much to see and, in addition, I wanted to visit the housing project which is nearly completed.

I had time, however, to see two or three friends at the hotel. After lunch, the Mayor's car took us to the airport where a number of Democratic ladies were kind enough to come and see us off on our plane, which was half an hour late.

In Dallas we had time to go to the hotel and have a comfortable dinner before we went to the airport to take the sleeper plane for Washington. We ran into a windy, rainy stretch and tossed about quite a bit before we reached Nashville, Tennessee. Then calm settled on us again and we arrived ahead of time, about 5:15 a.m. at the Washington airport.

I went to the White House, to be greeted by a number of the staff, who should never have been up at that early hour. Though I tried to go to sleep again, I might just as well have stayed up, for I was wide awake and glad to see my breakfast appear at eight-thirty. It is nice to feel settled again, and I am having no more long trips for some months to come.

As I look back on this trip, I feel that I know a little more about that vast State of Texas. I am not quite sure whether I shall not have to ask Miss Dorothy Thompson to join me on my next lecture trip, for everyone looks so disappointed when my secretary gives her first name and it is not Dorothy!

Yesterday was spent catching up on mail—which certainly had accumulated—and beginning to wrap up Christmas presents. I really enjoy going into my closet, where I accumulate things for this particular season, and doing them up with gay paper and ribbons and marking them for mailing. So many have to go far away this year, that they must be ready well ahead of time.

I lunched with the Secretary of the Treasury and Mrs. Morgenthau and the Secretary's father; a particular pleasure for I do not see Mr. Morgenthau, Sr., half as much as I would like. At tea time, Miss Grace Frysinger brought Lady Archer-Shee and Mrs. Roop from Virginia, to talk over some of the problems of our rural women in their organizations particularly in connection with their work in the Associated Country Women of the World. This organization, which includes women all over the world, is trying even now to keep in touch with some of its members in occupied areas and countries which are at war.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL