My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—Friday evening I attended the National Urban League. I am always impressed by the continuing and faithful interest shown by Dr. William J. Schieffelin, Judge Ulman of Baltimore, Md., and Mr. Hollister Wood, together with many others in the work of this organization. I think the Urban League has done much through the years to improve the conditions for the colored people and to create better understanding between colored and white people throughout the country.

All those of both races who have worked so earnestly together deserve our interest and gratitude. We are interested in democracy and believe that the success of democracy depends upon the rights of every individual citizen being recognized everywhere in the country. This will come only through patient work.

It is most interesting to find how many people were deeply impressed by the prayer which the President read the night before election. There must be a hunger in men's souls for a spiritual note even in such mundane things as political speeches. During the course of the past few days, a taxi-cab driver, our superintendent in the apartment house, my maid, a college professor and various other people have told me that such an ending to the campaign wiped out bitterness and gave them hope.

Yesterday morning we went down to a warehouse to see some of the paintings, sculpture and craft work which have come in for the exhibitions which will be held in the five boroughs of New York City during National Art Week, beginning November 25. Some 62 are already planned and the jury has been going over the exhibits.

I hope the purpose behind this week will be accomplished, that more people will realize when they like a picture, piece of sculpture, or a bit of pottery; that it is possible to obtain it and take it home to live with and enjoy permanently.

More and more we are going to art galleries and exhibitions and our appreciation of art has increased. But museums can not be the only market for an artist's wares and we must realize that many things are made to live with in our homes and not to be housed in museums.

I lunched with the United Parents Associations of New York City, and was delighted to have a chance to see the Mayor for a few minutes. Then I drove to Beacon to attend the wedding of my friend, Miss Jane Brett, and returned to New York City in time to see Miss Jane Wyatt, whom I have known for many years, in "Quiet Please."

The play is very light. Hollywood life may be interesting to those who live it, but it does not seem to have much "quiet" when portrayed on the stage. Jane Wyatt is charming, however, and I was in the mood to be amused, so, on the whole, I had a pleasant evening.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL