My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Yesterday morning I attended a meeting of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children. Since there are about a thousand children in this country, it will be necessary to retain a skeleton organization to keep in touch with them, and a certain amount of money will still have to be raised for this purpose.

Though no more children are to be sent over at present by Great Britain, there is a possibility that in one way or another during the next few months, that children from other countries may land on these shores. If they need care, the committee must be prepared to look after them. I feel that we must be able to expand later on if the call should come to care for children from other countries. This care must cover short periods of time, or in the case of orphan children, who come in under the quota, we may have to find permanent homes to provide care during the years of their minority.

I had a delightful lunch yesterday as the guest of Mr. Morris Ernst. Then I talked a few minutes with Mr. Daniel Tobin and some of the people working with him in the labor division of the Democratic National Committee Campaign Headquarters.

By 2:45 Miss Thompson and I started to drive back to the country. The colors are changing and are not quite as brilliant, but in some places a whole hillside seems to be even more beautiful with pastel shades predominating.

Back at the cottage, a cheery fire was burning in my sitting room and the tea table was standing in front of it. A little after 5:00, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Lent and their small boy, Jimmy, came to see me. Young Jimmy Lent is four years old and the first thing he asked on entering the house was: "Where is the radio?" He spent his time exploring every room and making friends with my maids, but was distressed to find that we had no small boy to play with him.

Mrs. George Huntington came to dinner and Mr. Alan Lomax came up from New York City bringing his guitar. We spent a delightful evening listening to folk songs of various kinds and talking over the questions which concern us all so deeply. Mr. Lomax is anxious that the storehouse of American culture, which he has helped to build up in the Congressional Library, should be of some value to the youth of the nation during its year of compulsory service. I hope Mr. Archibald MacLeish, Librarian of Congress, will find some way to make the life of America, as recorded in our folk songs, a part of the knowledge of all young Americans, for this year of service should be more than a period of military training.

This morning I was up at 6:00 o'clock to start on a flying trip throughout New York State to visit NYA projects.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL