My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—I am still revelling in the beauty which we enjoyed yesterday. I think this year the coloring is particularly vivid. Nothing could have been lovelier than the whole drive over the Mohawk Trail and then down through Pittsfield, Lenox and Stockbridge, Mass., to reach home about 6:00 o'clock.

We found two friends waiting to greet us and had a very pleasant evening, though Miss Thompson attacked the mountain of mail which is always the result of a few days' holiday. She brought me enough work at 10:30 to keep me busy until 3:00 a.m.

I did not get started so early this morning. After various telephone messages and the inevitable arrangements for the weekend, I finally mounted my horse and rode through the woods for an hour and a half. The sun is still deliciously warm, but all the flies are finally gone. There is something very invigorating in the air so that one feels one can do twice as much as is ordinarily possible.

My mother-in-law, her sister, Mrs. Price Collier and my sister-in-law, Mrs. J. R. Roosevelt, all came to lunch with me. Now they have gone and we are about to start out to do some errands in Poughkeepsie. This is really a wonderful shopping center. I don't often have the time to remember how much I could do here in the way of Christmas shopping, if I were only to put my mind on it early enough.

Next week, from the 6th to the 12th of October, will be National Business Women's Week. They have taken as their theme: "Business Women In A Democracy." During the current club year they are building their program around the idea of "Making Democracy Work."

I feel so strongly that this is a very important program and one in which all women should cooperate in forwarding. Business women are accustomed to organization. They know the value of planning a program and carrying it out systematically. They know how to obtain publicity and what kind of publicity will help to spread interest in democracy. The business women in this country could really organize many of the unorganized women and carry out a program of working in and for a democracy.

They would first have to make sure that every woman knew what democracy meant to her and saw in terms of the way she lives her daily life. That takes into account how she treats her friends and the people who work for her in her home or in other capacities where her life touches theirs and, above all, what she does to cooperate with her government to preserve democracy, not for herself alone, but for all the people in the country. If business women make their program a clarion call for the women of the nation, this year will be well spent.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL