My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NAHANT, Mass., Thursday—Yesterday proved to be a delightful day for driving. Though it clouded up once or twice, the sky was blue and the sun was not so bright as to tire my eyes. We drove back on the north side of the cape and went to Mattapoisett to see Mrs. Charles Hamlin.

It was a coincidence that, as I hesitated, wondering which lane led down to her house, two kindly looking people stood on the corner. The lady came forward and said she would like to shake hands with me, since she was from Boston and with her husband was ardently supporting the President. When I told Mrs. Hamlin of the incident, remarking that I imagined there were rather few people I would find with the same feeling thereabouts, she said: "They are almost the only summer people who feel that way."

We only had a short time with Mrs. Hamlin, but she showed us the havoc the storm had wrought two years ago and described so vividly the mountainous waves, that I could really imagine what it had been like.

On the table in her living room were a quantity of gourds and different varieties of little tomatoes and beautiful begonias, all of which she had been selling at a roadside stand for the benefit of the children's dental fund in the village. These were the leftovers, so I walked away with two boxes and decided this was my day for gifts.

When I left the hotel in Provincetown yesterday morning, the maid came dashing up with a jar of beach plum jelly. This jelly, I think, is very delicious and I was delighted to take it home to use on very special occasions and to share only with my friends of discriminating taste.

I stopped long enough in Plymouth for Miss Thompson to improve her education by a glimpse of Plymouth Rock. We both agreed that this is a very small stone for our forefathers to have put so much dependence and we are glad that what now remains of it is well protected. An energetic young man overtook us and suggested that we come up to see the old First Church, but I had done all my real sightseeing some years ago and was anxious to reach Nahant as early as possible.

Driving through Boston has always seemed to me a little confusing, but we went through yesterday with great ease because of the direction of a kindly garage man, plus a map of the city. We reached Nahant at 4:15 and a little later we had tea with my youngest grandson holding court on the sofa. He behaved very well and seemed to know at once that we were old friends. The only person whose nose is a little out of joint is Percy, the dachshund, who for four years held the center of the stage and now is obliged to share it.

John could not reach home until late, for they had a sale today at his branch store. He certainly enjoys his business and, after all, that is the most important element in all work we undertake.

This morning we left after the baby had his bath and are now on our way back to Hyde Park over the Mohawk Trail where the colors of autumn may be seen at their best.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL