My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—I paid a visit yesterday morning to the Democratic National Headquarters, and to my delight found my old and dear friend, Miss Molly Dewson, back to help in the campaign. Mrs. Dorothy McAllister, who is in charge of the women's division, told me with great joy of her arrival, and I went at once in search of her and found her looking up all her old friends.

She was chatting in Mr. Charles Michelson's office and we visited several other people together. We wanted to see Mr. Farley and Mr. Flynn, but both the gentlemen were out. I imagine Molly went back again. Later, I succeeded in seeing Mr. Flynn for a few minutes, but unfortunately was unable to be there when Mr. Farley was in his office.

I had not seen Miss Dewson for some time, but I felt as everyone else did—enthusiastic over her return. I always like to go to see Mrs. McAllister and all the others who are working so hard at the National headquarters, but I shall enjoy it doubly now that Molly's dry humor will be there to light up every incident.

Last night I dined with the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, affiliated with the AFL. It was the 15th anniversary of their biennial convention. These men have made life comfortable and pleasant for me on many long journeys, and I know that they had a long hard fight before they gained recognition of their union.

I did not know until Mayor LaGuardia spoke, that he had been one of the people at their first organization meetings. I am constantly finding where there has been a struggle for the rights of labor and for the recognition of human values, regardless of race, creed or color, that the Mayor of New York City has been in it from the start. If satisfaction has finally come in the gains of freedom and justice meted out to any groups of human beings, he can take pride in their achievement because he has carried his share of the fight.

It was quite a lengthy party and the breakfast hour this morning arrived all too soon. I had to hurry to be ready when my doorbell rang to announce Franklin, Jr., and Mr. Lanthier were on hand to take me to the steamer to meet Mr. Leopold Stokowski and the All-American Youth Orchestra, which has been touring South America. They were very good before they left, but I am sure from all the accounts which I have heard that they are even better now.

I am told that their performances have made a vast difference in the way that people feel about the United States in many South American countries. The sixteen girls in the orchestra have created so much comment that they say the position of women in orchestras will be changed for all time in consequence.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL