My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I picked up a friend who was spending the day with me in New York City yesterday morning and returned to the country in the afternoon. Then I went to keep two appointments.

The first was to talk about a meeting of the United Parents Association in the autumn, and the second was with a committee from the Society of Podiatricians.

They have a bill in Congress which will give them recognition in the Army and Navy on the same basis as dentists and other specialized groups who do not have M.D. degrees. It seems to me they will certainly be useful in the services. Soldiers on the march and sailors standing watch on board ship, both need this care for their general health and happiness.

In the afternoon I went out to the World's Fair, feeling very sorry that the weather had been so bad all morning, for I knew it would spoil the day for the rural young people who had planned a big meeting in the Court of Peace.

First, I visited the Brazilian Pavilion and drank some delicious coffee with the Commissioner and his wife. We looked at the murals, which are extremely interesting and depict different phases of life in various parts of Brazil. These murals should, of course be viewed from a greater distance than their present location permits but they are colorful and bold in execution.

The rural meeting had been moved to the Assembly Hall at the Fair, where Mr. Harvey Gibson, Dr. J. A. Linke of the United States Office of Education, Dr. M. L. Wilson, Director of the Extension Service in the Department of Agriculture, were all assembled. On account of the weather, the ceremonies were brief, and many young people must have been disappointed.

From there I went to the Finnish Pavilion to unveil the poster which the American Committee for Aid to Finland is putting out in a campaign to gain members to help in their work.

Under the direction of a well-known Finnish architect, a group of students at MIT are planning reconstruction work and the building from the ground up of a city in Finland. It is an interesting undertaking and the models which they show of the new villages they are planning, are certainly an improvement over what was destroyed. It must, however be hard to rehouse so many people who have lost their homes.

My last visit at the Fair was to the model of Quoddy Dam built by the NYA. Then we drove home, arriving after 7:00 o'clock.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL