My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—My little birds have flown this morning out into a strange world all by themselves. I hope they lead happy bird lives and are preserved from the many dangers they must meet, long enough, at least, to give them a few months of whatever constitutes happy bird life!

We sat and listened to the radio last night until the early hours of the morning. Curiously enough, I feel a little the way those young birds felt when they finally flapped off the window sill. The world we are going into is certainly an unknown quantity to all of us. For anyone near you, to be nominated today for the Presidency of these United States, whether for a first or a third term, is a very serious thing. A heavy responsibility at home for domestic policies, and a heavy responsibility to shape a policy to guide this nation in the peaceful way that our people desire in the troubled world of today.

No one knows what will happen on election day, but during the next few months the two nominees must face the future and tell the people what their experience, their background and their vision makes them see as the mission of this country at home and abroad. Beyond that no one can know. It seems too solemn a thing for me to wish for more at the present time than that the candidates may be given the ability to put their beliefs sincerely before the people. God grant the people will be given the wisdom to choose wisely, not for themselves alone, but with a realization of the weight of their responsibility in the world.

We all went to bed so late it was rather difficult to get up this morning. So far the day has been anything but a normal day, for, after several urgent messages came through from Chicago last night, my husband agreed that, since he could not go himself to the Democratic Convention, because of his feeling that he should not be so far away from Washington, he would like me to go. I think he hoped I might be able to give the delegates a personal sense of appreciation he feels for their confidence in him, even though the service required is such a heavy responsibility.

The various changes in arrangements which had been made here for the day, the plans for flying out and returning as rapidly as possible, have made this a very busy morning. I was in New York City all day yesterday, and so am somewhat behind in much of my work, but I hope to be back here early tomorrow morning.

Franklin, Jr., is coming up from Washington to go out to Chicago with Mr. C. R. Smith, President of the American Airlines, and myself, and I shall be happy to see Elliott and Ruth, even though it will be for a very brief time.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL