My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Lakeside, Ohio, where I spoke yesterday, is very like Chautauqua in New York State. It is run by the Methodist Church people, and offers a religious program as well as many other types of educational and pleasurable entertainment. The location on Lake Erie is very beautiful and the opportunity for sports and out-of-door recreation must make it a haven for many families.

The auditorium holds about 4,000 people, but they have smaller auditoriums which are turned over to the young people for meetings. This is a favorite meeting place for groups of the Epworth League. The Northern Ohio Federation of Women's Clubs was holding its meetings there, and the head of the Toledo, Ohio, club came to see me.

Perhaps I am wrong in feeling that a great many of our women are still living in the world which they hope exists, rather than in the world which really does exist today. They are still talking of world peace and what we can do to bring about peace in this world, in the hope that it can be accomplished at the present time and in the same way that peace groups have worked for many years.

This is discouraging to me, for I feel that our situation in the world is so completely changed that old methods and old approaches must be changed in order to meet it. However, I hope sincerely that I am wrong and that we may not be facing as serious a situation as seems indicated by recent events.

I was impressed yesterday by the interest that people are taking in giving homes to refugee children. A young woman, who has started a nursery school in Toledo, came in to tell me that she would attempt to raise money to support a group of refugee children in her school, and she and her colleagues would donate their care. This seemed to me a very generous offer from a very small nursery school which is just getting on its feet. I hope she will be able to find people to sponsor some children, for she seems to have a very good plant.

Some members of the Sandusky Altrusa Club came in to present me with a very beautiful corsage bouquet. On every hand friendly people waited to greet me, which is always a pleasant experience.

We drove to Cleveland after the lecture, some 75 miles, but the road was good and we had an hour in a hotel to rest before we took a plane to New York City. This is the first time, I think, that I have been on a night plane and failed to see the sun rise, but I was so sleepy that it did not matter to me in the least when and how the sun rose. I slept until the stewardess awakened me to say that we would be in New York City in fifteen minutes.

Today seems to me fairly warm and I shall be glad when our New York City appointments are over and we wend our way back to the country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL