My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—I seem to be in the business of correcting statements these days! Apparently, in saying that Park Commissioner Moses and Mayor La Guardia gave the people of the lower end of Manhattan a very lovely parkway, I left out many of the people who really did the work.

This I did not intend to do, and I think we should all be grateful to Borough President of Manhattan Stanley Isaacs who had complete charge of the construction of the East River Drive; to Walter D. Binger, Commissioner of Borough Works and Lester C. Hammond, Chief Engineer in charge of design and construction.

The letters giving me all this information came from Mrs. Mabel H. Pooler and Georgia C. Van Veln. I am very grateful to them for correcting me. I have also heard from two or three other interested citizens, and one of them, Mr. A. J. Davis, suggests that I should thank the taxpayers whose properties were condemned, and bemoans the fact that depositors in the savings banks are only getting 2 percent interest on their money because the banks owned most of the condemned property.

Of course, we are always grateful to taxpayers who make any improvement possible, but the 2 percent interest we receive on our savings accounts does not seem to me so small, for if we desired we could take out our money and put it to work in some way in which we might employ more people and bring us a higher rate of interest. We put it in the savings banks because we feel that there it is entirely safe and guaranteed by the Government. Savings banks are restricted in their investments in order to insure the safety of our deposits and that is why we accept a smaller amount of interest.

It certainly was nice to greet my husband and our son, Jimmy, when they arrived at the house this morning. Major Hooker and I had a nice, but rather short, ride, since I am trying to do a number of things before my regular broadcast which precedes the brief ceremonies, when the new library will be finally turned over to the archivist.

Perhaps the fascination about even the smallest place in the country is that there is always something you want to do. I have discovered a stonemason nearby who lays walls in the old-fashioned way. Our lane leading off from the main highway has always been unmarked, so now I am planning two low stone gateposts and some wrought iron letters from Mr. Denny's forge in Poughkeepsie, which should make it easier to identify the entrance to these cottages.

We are very proud of our garden this year. The vegetables seem to be thriving with plenty of rain, even though the sun visits us fitfully and the weather is more nearly like autumn than mid-summer.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL