My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—A country inn has moved into our vicinity in New York City. If there is any part of a big city that seems like a village, it is around Washington Square and, therefore, a country inn, looking for a home in New York City, would naturally gravitate to this part of it. The food is good and the atmosphere quiet, so I recommend this inn if you want a place to eat leisurely and chat peacefully.

When I wander around this part of New York City, I remember a very charming, gentle old lady, my cousin Mrs. Weekes, who once danced with Lafayette. She used to tell me how, in her early married days, her husband took the market basket on one arm while she clung to the other and was piloted through the busy streets to do her marketing in MacDougal Alley.

She was not accustomed to the great metropolis, so he never let her go out alone. Sometimes he did the marketing for her, for the head of the family was really the head of the family in those days and took some real responsibility about the housekeeping.

The rain spoiled my chance last evening to hear Mrs. Francis Biddle's poem sung at the Lewisohn Stadium, but Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lewisohn gave us a great treat by inviting some of us to the Cosmopolitan Club to hear Mrs. Biddle read her poem. Mr. Ross played a little of William Grant Still's music and Miss Louise Burge sang the Negro mother's lament for her boy who had been lynched. It had all the simplicity of expression and all the depths of emotion so well expressed by the Negro voice.

This morning I started out early to attend a meeting of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children. I am thankful beyond words that it is going to be possible to do something for these European children, but my heart is heavy when I think of the tragedies which haunt the lives of many grown people.

Under the quota we have received a number of German, Austrian, Italian and Spanish refugees. People who have been marked people in their own countries because of their active opposition to Fascist or Nazi regimes. They have left behind them, however, in France, Sweden and England members of their families, intimate friends, beloved political leaders and now cannot rest in safety because of the dangers which surround these loved ones.

Many of these people could help us greatly in the next few weeks or months, for they know how Communists, Nazis and Fascists work. They know how propaganda is spread, how young people are influenced. They are as good material as the political refugees who came with Carl Schurz, the German, or Kosciusko, the Pole, whose statues we have taught our young people to honor because of their love of liberty.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL