My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday —Yesterday morning, at the invitation of Mrs. Pearl Buck, I signed a book which is to be sent to the women of China as a tribute for the way in which they have carried on during these past years. Women in every country are being forced to show qualities of heroism and endurance which in recent years of civilization they have hardly been called upon to develop.

Somehow or other, the inevitable is always met and the march of force at the moment seems to have an inevitable ending of oppression and sorrow for those who fall beneath its power, and the victims show an unexpected kind of stoic strength.

After my broadcast yesterday, we went directly to the Ethical Culture School at Fieldston, where some scenes from plays were given by high school students. These plays were written and produced by the youngsters themselves. They did their own research. The object was the development of a better understanding and more real fellowship between the representatives of different races and cultures. In their plays the young people touched on all the questions which confront their elders.

When the plays were over, Professor Lindeman of the New School for Social Research led a panel up on the stage to discuss the value of these productions. Half of the panel consisted of teachers who had assisted their students, either as part of the curriculum or as extra-curricula activities, in producing these plays. The rest of us were lay people, though, as I think it over, I was the only genuine lay person there, everybody else could claim to be an expert in some field.

Not only the panel, but the audience and the actors took part in the discussion. I am more and more impressed with the ability developed in high school students to express themselves and to have definite views of their own based on reasons which they can explain.

We reached Hyde Park at about 6:00 o'clock and found our only guest was a young artist, Mr. Mitchell Jamieson, who has been doing some water color sketches of the countryside. Soon after we arrived, Lieutenant Cole, who brought up some of our horses yesterday, appeared to spend the night and we had a very pleasant evening.

Everyone went to bed early. The van with the horses had been loaded at 3:30 a.m., and actually had left Fort Myer, Va., 4:00 a.m. and those who came with it were sleepy. The rest of us were equally ready for the peace and quiet of a long country night. My sleeping porch seemed particularly attractive and the frog chorus put me to sleep.

This morning I went over to the big house to see my mother-in-law, only to find that she is not yet back from New York City. I am going down shortly to lunch with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau Jr., and then return to New York City for a few hours to hold a meeting of various organizations interested in the question of bringing refugee children to this country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL