My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—On Friday we went to Boston to see my new grandchild and, like every proper grandmother, I feel I must record my enthusiasm. He is a sweet baby with a nicely shaped head and ears that lie flat against his head. His hair is so fair that it hardly shows. He refused to open his eyes for me, so I don't know their color, but I surmise it's blue. I was only allowed to see him through a glass window, so I am looking forward to seeing him next in his own home and knowing more about him. I am sure he is going to be a real person very soon.

On the whole, our family works and plays hard, but there is one member who takes his job so seriously that not even the advent of a baby curtails his working hours. Don't think John lost one hour. I am glad of this, for there is a real obligation on every one of us these days to do our job, whatever it may be, a little better than we have done it before.

In that way we may contribute more jobs for people and be a steadying influence to those people who feel that, because we face troubled times, none of the daily routine of life is important. There never was a time when it was more important. If the need comes for any of us to do a different kind of work from what we are doing at present, the call will be unmistakable. But the fact that we do our daily jobs well will make it easier for anyone who has to take our place, and will make us more efficient in anything else we have to take up. Besides, going on with the daily routine, keeps our feet on the ground and that is sorely needed in times like these.

Two extremes have come to me in the last few days. One was a young man who announced to me that all talk of a "fifth column" was ridiculous and that there was no such thing in the United States. This, just because he and his friends and those with whom he had talked, did not happen to touch any "fifth column" activities. On the other hand, a woman suggested that we all go out and learn to shoot and sleep with a gun beside our beds in preparation for parachute troops or riots in our neighborhoods. Both of these attitudes are obviously silly. We want to take proper precautions through the constituted authorities but, in other ways, we want to go on with our daily life and our daily job in calm security.

We returned here late Friday night and yesterday was a fairly busy day. I spoke at the luncheon meeting in Poughkeepsie of the County Democratic Women's Voters League. After that, Miss Thompson and I dined with a friend and had a most beautiful drive while the new moon played hide and seek among the clouds.

Today the sun is playing hide and seek, but the weather is mild and everything is beautifully green. Mr. Smith, our nearest farm neighbor, sent us some fresh asparagus for lunch. I wish I didn't have to leave immediately afterward for Washington.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL