My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—I must finish telling about my day in Wheeling, West Virginia. The Coal Area Council gave us a tea soon after we reached the hotel. Then I had a visit with the Junior League Group, which is running a small settlement house where they are trying to interest unemployed boys in a program of recreation and, through that making an attempt to find them jobs. Later a group of Democratic women called and a little girl came as a delegate from her school to get an autograph book signed.

Finally, I went to my lecture. While there, poor Mrs. Morgenthau was told that no one could find the copy of my column, so she spent a harrowing evening trying to locate it. The loss was partly my own fault and partly that of the messenger boy, who evidently decided that the word "press" on the copy meant that it had to be taken to a newspaper, instead of meaning the rate at which it was to be sent. I had not explained carefully enough that it had to go to the telegraph office. Someday, perhaps, I shall learn all the different ways in which one may lose a column.

We took the night train to Washington. Saturday was largely spent catching up on mail, although I drove out to Mrs. William Corcoran Eustis' place, "Oatlands," in the afternoon to meet some of her neighbors, teachers, social workers and others.

They were a most interesting group. I enjoyed being with them and having them ask me certain questions which I did not always feel adequately prepared to answer. I have not been in Mrs. Eustis' garden since 1918, and it is now one of the most beautiful formal gardens I have ever seen. Great bushes of box make it fragrant and I do not wonder that Mrs. Eustis is proud of what she has achieved in the way of grace and beauty.

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Gould and their young daughter were with us for the night, and also Mr. and Mrs. Rundle Gilbert with their small son. With Diana Hopkins this makes three children in the house and it is nice to hear their voices.

Sunday was a fairly busy day and in the late afternoon I flew up to New York City to go to a meeting of the New York City Council of the American Youth Congress. This morning I am leaving for Philadelphia to spend the day with Mrs. Curtin Winsor and to see our grandson, Bill Roosevelt, and her other little boy. This evening she will drive me over after early dinner to Haddonfield, N. J., where, after my lecture, a car from Washington will pick me up and motor me to New York City.

I have said little or nothing the past few days about European news. When in Washington there is little else that one can think about, but one tries to avoid it as a topic of conversation. Since the President was preparing his speech last weekend, everyone in the house was keenly aware not only of the aspects of the European situation, but of its implications for each and every one of us.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL