My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—There are two celebrations in New York City this coming week in which I think everybody should be interested. On Monday, the women's division of the Jewish Education Association, known as Ivriah, is giving their springtime breakfast and will present a play: "A Child Shall Lead Them." This organization has done fine constructive work in adult education projects for mothers who are in need of help in the care of their young children. They also provide scholarships for many children, who would otherwise find life hard to face. Their work has been reflected in better general welfare of the groups which they touch. Their annual springtime breakfast should attract many people because of the worthiness of the cause.

Then, on the 23rd of this month, the New York Zoological Society will hold its garden party for members. I am one of the interested members who think to preserve beauty so near the crowded city streets, and to give an opportunity to young and old to study the various animals in surroundings nearly typical of their usual habitats, is something of real value. I wish I could be present and that the interest of the public in this opportunity were greater.

On Friday afternoon, I received a group of ladies who were attending the convention of the Tall Cedars of Lebanon. Yesterday, the high school seniors from Arthurdale, West Virginia, lunched with me in the garden. In the afternoon I attended a tea which was given to celebrate the publication of Mr. Bruce Melvin's book, "Youth—Millions Too Many?" This book is written by a man who has worked in the research division of the WPA on many questions affecting youth. It is, I think, a valuable contribution on this subject and should be read by those who have an interest in this problem.

Yesterday morning, for the first time this week, I had a chance to ride and went to the stables to see a new horse which has just been presented to me by the Tennessee Walking Horse Association. He is a beautiful sorrel gelding, five years old, with a most kind and gentle expression. I hope I am going to have a great deal of pleasure getting acquainted with "Charlie" and riding him frequently when Washington duties are less heavy.

Today has been a day of rest, but the anxiety which hangs over everybody seems to bring its quota of fatigue. I notice that many with whom I come in contact these days seem to be exhausted more by the state of apprehension in which we are living than by the actual work we do.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL