My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ASHEVILLE, N.C., Friday—Before leaving Miami yesterday, we had a whole morning free, so I had a luxurious shampoo. Then Dr. and Mrs. Frank Christian and their daughters came to call. We reached the train in ample time and, in going into the dining car, had a most pleasant surprise. We found our Chicago friends, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Flynn, and enjoyed very much lunching with them. Little surprises of this kind are what make travelling such fun. When you like people a great deal, it is particularly pleasant to have a chance to see them when you haven't expected it.

We worked the rest of the afternoon on a number of things which had been waiting to be done when we had a few consecutive hours of quiet. The train was crowded with people coming North. They were evidently reluctant to give up their vacation spirit and so clung to the clothes which they had been wearing during their holiday. Bright colored slack suits made the dinner quite a charming picture.

When we went in for dinner, it was crowded and we had to wait about fifteen minutes, but we were through dinner before we reached Jacksonville, where we changed for Asheville, N. C. The trip this morning up into the mountains has been perfectly beautiful. The young green of the trees with luxuriant white dogwood gleaming through the woods and numerous noisy little brooks tumbling down the hills over the gray rocks, have made every turn a joy to the eye.

One thing surprised and interested me. In a little clearing on the side of a hill, we saw two mountain cabins, no different from the average type, though they looked a little better built. What a change there was, however, in the outward surroundings. Each of them had a little stone wall holding up a grass terrace in front of the porch and planted all around it were the lovely purple flowers which grow like a carpet through the woods. Some little trees had evidently been planted around the cabins and I could not help feeling that some very good influence had been at work to make such neat and tidy exteriors, where one is never surprised to find careless and ill-kept cabins, outbuildings and yards.

It was nice to arrive at a familiar homelike place like the Grove Park Inn. Now we are looking forward to a pleasant afternoon before the lecture tonight. I have not seen either Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre or Miss Durand, who are here, since they left Washington. My husband was here last autumn, but I was not with him, so it is really quite exciting to see them all in a short time. I have another friend here, whom I hope to see this afternoon.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL