My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Wednesday—I left Washington yesterday on the 2:00 o'clock plane for New York City and attended Mr. George Carlin's tea. Here the columnists writing for the United Feature Syndicate stand in line and greet the gentlemen and ladies who are kind enough to make their columns available to the public. I always enjoy this party very much and regretted to have to miss it last year, and so am particularly glad that I could be present this year. After it was over, and I had had a chat with another group that wanted to speak to me, I went down to my apartment where I had a quiet supper and went to the evening plane which landed me in Miami early this morning.

There was a time when I found dressing, undressing and sliding myself into an airplane berth and buckling the strap across, quite a difficult undertaking. Now I have all my bags arranged and manage it all with comparative ease and get just as good a night's sleep as if I were at home, which just shows how one can accustom oneself to various things. I can't say, however, that I enjoy arriving anywhere at 5:30 a.m. It is beautiful once you are up, the air has a nice clean washed feeling and when the first effort is over you wonder why you don't do it more often. In spite of that, I don't find that I do it often.

This is a very different trip than the one I took in February, when I came here for holiday making. I am installed in a very comfortable and large hotel. But I don't look forward to hours of peace and quiet.

At 9:00 a.m., Mr. Beecher, the representative of the Farm Security Administration will come for me and we will go on an all-day jaunt to see some of the Farm Security work in this area.

Talking of camps, I have been very much interested in a request which comes to me from New York City. A camp fund called, "The Johanna M. Lindlof Camp Fund" has been set up to establish some camps for public school children during the summer months. Mrs. Lindlof is a member of the Board of Education and, with several other people who are familiar with the problems, such as Dr. Angelo Patri, Miss Ruth Gillette Hardy, Dr. Isidore Kayfetz, Mr. Frederick Schoedel, Mr. Samuel Goldman and Miss Eva M. Larry, Mrs. Lindlof is establishing these camps where children will have a month's vacation. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate the special values of camps operated by the Board of Education. It is believed that city children can benefit greatly from a camp program which will initiate them into life out of doors where the need of enterprise and ability will train them to assume and carry responsibilities in their various activities. I speak of it here, because it seems to me that this plan might be of interest to other boards of education in other cities.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL