My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—Life has been lived rather rapidly since my return. I suddenly realized today that I had forgotten to mention the riot of daffodils in the garden between the White House and the President's office. The magnolia trees are out and the grass is beautifully green and, though we haven't seen much sun, spring is really here.

The President, if nothing untoward happens, hopes to journey to Warm Springs, Ga., tonight where the air will be even balmier. He had intended to take this trip while I was away, but these days one can never tell from day to day what one may be doing. Now he hopes for a few days in Georgia to catch up on many of his interests there and to have a little rest, but I shall have to stay around here and fulfill a number of engagements which have been made. I shall, however, have time to go to Hyde Park and, though they tell me it is still winter there, I am going to think about the garden.

My trip to Philadelphia was rather a satisfactory experience. On the train I drew all the checks for bills which have been piling up on my desk and reminding me that I must sometime have a little writing session. The luncheon was pleasant, for I saw a number of people whom I enjoyed seeing again. Then I went in for a minute to greet the Philadelphia Motion Picture Preview Study Group at their luncheon. I spent a half hour afterward with Mrs. Curtin Winsor and her two children. My grandson, Bill, is getting to be a big boy and in a year plans to take his little brother riding.

On the way back on the train, I started to read the manuscript of a book I hope I can finish within the next few days. I was home in plenty of time to prepare for dinner. Miss Thompson stayed here for the whole evening and left the results of her extra labors for me to cope with on my return from dinner, which meant a long period of work, but I had so much sleep on my trip that I haven't yet felt the need of it here!

I went down this morning with Mrs. Morgenthau and Miss Hickok to see a preview of a "March of Time" movie. On the whole it is good. It deals with the situation of youth, which is perhaps the most difficult problem to show accurately, because it must run the gamut from complete despair to ever renewed hope.

We then visited the Unemployment Compensation Board and the Minimum Wage Board offices of the District of Columbia for the Democratic Digest. There is no District of Columbia Labor Department and it seems to be sadly needed. Sometimes I should like to be able to report that something I had seen in the District was absolutely perfect! Alas, I cannot do so yet, for there is a woeful lack of safety for workers in local industries, evidenced by the fact that the accident rates are much higher than for other similar occupations throughout the country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL