My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN FRANCISCO, Tuesday—Saturday evening, one of the ranger photographers and one of the naturalists showed us some marvelous colored pictures of the scenery, flowers and animals of Yosemite National Park, which we had observed during the day. They also ran off some movies of my trip in the park in 1934, which brought back pleasant memories.

We spent Sunday in the Yosemite Valley, catching up on our work in the morning and taking a walk before lunch. In the afternoon, we went with Superintendent and Mrs. Merriam to the museum and the Indian village and then to their home for tea.

We hated to leave on Monday, but were grateful for two glorious days. Seven o'clock Monday morning saw us on our way to San Mateo where we lunched with Mrs. Edward MacCauley and several guests, among them the authors of "An American Exodus," Dorothea Lange and Paul S. Taylor, whom I was particularly glad to meet. It seems to me that in the pictures and in the spirit, this book marks a high point in artistry and shows us what life means to some of our citizens.

We left at 3:00 o'clock and drove to Palo Alto. The press conference was extremely informal, attended by only one photographer, the acting mayor, two or three press representatives, together with Miss Gene Dulin, who represented the Theta Sigma Phi and Sigma Delta Chi.

A little later my son, Jimmy, motored down from San Francisco and Miss Chaney also joined us with a friend, so we were a small party for dinner. We then proceeded to the lecture, after which there was a question period and a reception for the twenty or more young people representing the groups sponsoring the lecture. This is not a university responsibility, but a direct responsibility of the young people themselves. They seemed to me very efficient, for they told us their tickets were all sold, and they were very businesslike in all their arrangements.

A new and interesting activity in the field of aviation was drawn to my attention the other day by a gentleman who has been making a survey of the possibilities of establishing an organization to build model airplanes that will interest handicapped youngsters in crippled children's hospitals, orphanages, and reform schools. This work will be privately financed. It appears to be a valuable hobby for both boys and girls, for it will teach them craftsmanship and patience and give them free play to the inventive instinct without involving much expense or any personal risk.

We are about to leave by car for Reno, Nevada, where I speak tonight. At last my diary is caught up again, which is a considerable achievement.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL